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Sub-Lease Small Offices
How To Sub-Lease Small Offices To Save Money

Sub-Leasing Small Offices Can Develop Into A Big Business

The average office suite contains two offices and a reception area, and some firms have to much space; so sub-lease small offices to save money.

Having a lot of office space is fine for some well-established small firms, but too much space and too much rent for the lone sales representative, or accountant just starting out is not practical.

For example, a smart entrepreneur leased a whole floor in a modern building in New York.

He got it cheap because a major firm had moved out and it had been vacant for a while due to the pandemic.

He divided it into small one-room offices, put in a switchboard, and advertised “Offices for Rent” in the local paper.

Instead of paying $900 to $1500 for an average office suite, single businessmen could set up a good address and small office for less than $1000.

In addition, the switchboard operator operated a secretarial service and would prepare letters for a per-page price.

There was also a conference room available at no extra charge on a sign-up basis for occasional big meetings.

The idea caught on like wildfire and there were soon other offices available on the same basis.

Check out the office rental situation where you are.

If nobody is providing this kind of service, go for it.

If you don’t have a good credit rating, see if you can’t talk a wealthy investor into signing the papers for you, so he can be your partner.

He can take half or more of the profits, but you can gain the experience and next time you won’t need him to sign the lease.

If it works in one town, it may work as well in another.

Major expense after renovating the office is small classified ads and any pay for the switchboard operator.

Over the years, this can develop into a big business as professionals return to downtown offices.

Photo By phmaxiestevez

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