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Broadband Providers In Rural Areas

Broadband Providers In Rural Areas Are Giving The Hook Up

The Advantages Of Broadband In Rural Areas

Remotely located families and businesses in rural America need broadband providers in rural areas  just as much as people who live in urban areas.

Broadband is an important tool for expanding educational and economic opportunities for consumers in remote locations.

Broadband allows you to take advantage of services not available or not convenient to use with a dial-up Internet connection, such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP), an alternative to traditional voice telephone service.

Broadband makes “telemedicine” possible: patients in rural areas can confer online with medical specialists in more urban areas and share information and test results very quickly.

Broadband helps you efficiently access and use many reference and cultural resources via the Internet.

You also need broadband to best take advantage of many distance learning opportunities, like online college or university courses, and continuing or senior education programs.

Broadband allows you to shop online more quickly and efficiently.

AT&T – 15,832,000 Subscribers – DSL access at speeds up to 6 Mbit/s and hybrid DSL/fiber access (U-Verse) at speeds up to 45 Mbit/s. Fiber access available at up to 1 Gbit/s.

Cablevision – 2,784,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds up to 101 Mbit/s.

CenturyLink – 6,071,000 Subscribers – DSL and fiber access at speeds up to 40 Mbit/s.

Charter– 5,441,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds up to 100 Mbit/s.

Comcast – 22,868,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds up to 105 Mbit/s. But may maxed out with its maximum plan (Extreme 505, speeds at over 505 Mbit/s).

Cox– 4,300,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds of 5 to 150 Mbit/s.

Frontier – 2,415,500 Subscribers – DSL access at speeds from 6 to 12 Mbit/s. Fiber access with speeds up to 10 Gbit/s.

HughesNet – 659,000 Subscribers – Satellite Internet speeds from 3 to 12 Mbit/s. also offers in many locations.

Mediacom – 1,067,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds from 3 to 150 Mbit/s.

Suddenlink – 1,202,400 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds from 50 to 150 Mbit/s. Also offers fiber up to 1 Gbit/s.

Time Warner – 13,016,000 Subscribers – Cable Internet access at speeds up to 300 Mbit/s.

Verizon – 9,223,000 Subscribers – DSL access at speeds of 0.5 to 15 Mbit/s and fiber access (FiOS) at speeds of 50 to 500 Mbit/s.

WildBlue– 400,000 Subscribers – Satellite Internet speeds from 3 to 12 Mbit/s. also offers in many locations.

Windstream – 1,109,600 Subscribers – DSL access at speeds from 3 to 12 Mbit/s. Also offers fiber, Metro Ethernet & T1 speeds, up to 1 Gbit/s.

Getting Broadband In Your Area

Contact your local library and see if it has applied for the federal E-rate program, which subsidizes broadband to libraries and schools.

Contact local government officials and ask what they can do to attract broadband service providers to your area. It is typically expensive to extend a broadband network to a new area. Your county or municipality may be able to offer a broadband provider video franchise rights, making building out a broadband network more attractive to potential providers. Talk with your state government or state public service commission to see what is being done or can be done to get broadband to your area. For contact information for your state public service commission, go to the National Association Of Regulatory Utility Commission (NARUC.org).

Resource:

The National Broadband Map is a tool to search, analyze and map broadband availability across the United States. Created and maintained by the NTIA, in collaboration with the FCC, and in partnership with 50 states, five territories and the District of Columbia.

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