It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInDigg thisPin on Pinterest

Collecting And Storing Drinking Water In A Tank House

If you are not old school, then you probably don’t know what a tank house is.

The tank house was and still is a good solution for collecting and storing (potable) drinking water.

Before I explain what a tank house is, I will summarize the need for an extra source of potable water, that is safe enough for drinking and food preparation.

I believe that the world’s population will soon suffer an extreme shortage of clean water that will cause it to become more expensive than oil.

When this happens, many small urban and rural towns will not have an independent water supply.

They already rely on buying potable water from another municipality to resale to their consumers; and the costs are increasing rapidly.

One solution to the problem for rural homesteaders is reviving the tank house (water tank) for an emergency supply of potable water.

In case you’re thinking that drinking water will always be plentiful, global statistics show that the demand will outweigh supply:

  • 89% of people have access to water suitable for drinking.
  • 4 billion have access to tap water.
  • 2.3 billion have access to wells or public taps.
  • 1.8 billion still use an unsafe drinking water source.

In terms of the demand, it is important to realize where drinking water comes from.

Drinking water comes from one source, rain, that provides ground water and surface water.

Ground water originates from rain or snow that falls and seeps into the ground.

Surface water is non-salt water on the surface of the Earth in streams, rivers, and lakes.

If We Could Drink Salt Water, There Would Be No Problem

All mammals are comprised of mostly water, so it is essential to life and health.

Without drinking water, people panic and die.

Most people with access to tap water ignore the steadily increasing cost of water service, as long as they can turn on the tap for drinking, bathing, washing, flushing toilets, and watering plants; while others trust the private water system for bottled water.

Depending solely on public or private drinking water is not sustainable for future, long-term consumption, in the United States and other parts of the world.

The Tank House

The tank house is a good solution for collecting and storing drinking water for survival.

A tank house is a water tower and tiny house combined enclosed by siding.

Tank houses were once a self-contained domestic water system supplying the house and garden.

The system consisted of a windmill, a hand-dug well and the tank house.

The windmill pumped water from the well up into the tank at the top of the tank house, from where it flowed down under gravity pressure to the house and garden.

The system used no fuel or electricity to pump water.

It can supply water for a long time with the windmill pump because it refills the tank.

Today, it would be called green or eco-friendly.

The Tank House Water Tower

A tank house water tower consists of an elevated structure supporting a water tank constructed at a height sufficient to push the water into a domestic water distribution system.

The common materials used for constructing the water tower are hardwood or steel (welded or bolted).

The Tank House Water Tank

A tank house water tank is a container for storing drinking water.

The need for any type of water tank is as old as civilization to provide storage of water for use in many applications such as:

  • Drinking water
  • Food preparation
  • Livestock
  • Agriculture irrigation
  • Fire suppression

The tank house water tank also serves as a reservoir to help with water needs during peak usage times.

The water level in the water tank typically falls during the peak usage hours of the day, and then a pump fills it back up during the night.

This process also keeps the water from freezing in cold weather, since the tower is constantly being drained and refilled.

The general design of the tank is round.

The common materials used for making an elevated water tank are California redwood, tin, and steel (welded or bolted), and stainless steel or plastic linings.

The Tank House Tiny House

You would never know that the tank house could be a tiny house, but it’s true as you can see in the photos.

The tank house typically had three floors, and two were used for bedrooms, offices, etc.

Resource:

To find out if wind power is a good option in your region, see the wind maps at WindPoweringAmerica.gov

Are You A Cash-Strapped Woman Who Wants To Start A Homestead As A Business?

As a single woman who’s been earning money online as a work-at-home entrepreneur since 1998, I’m here to teach you how! Believe me, I’ve been cash-strapped! In 2009, I was living in a 350 sf 1-bedroom apartment (box) where I cleared about $68,000 worth of debt. I became debt-free for the first time in my life! Today, I’m still beating all odds by homesteading as a business, and living the rural lifestyle! You’re in the right place to get the information, resources and tools you need to SAVE THOUSANDS of dollars, start a homestead as a business and make rural money at home / online. I want you to have instant access to me so click the Contact Us link to leave your name and best email. No spam (my record is clean) just great communication and opportunities from someone who’s been there and cares.

You Might Also Like.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInDigg thisPin on Pinterest

Leave a Comment