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Fur Is In Demand It Keeps You Warm

Starting a roadkill couture business is a wild and unique concept that is in high demand in the fur industry.

It could also be a boon for fur harvesters and artisan designers in rural areas.

My research revealed Pamela Paquin who home stitches fashionable items from “accidental fur” as she prefers to call it.

Her designs include:

  • Neck muffs
  • Wraps
  • Scarves
  • Leg warmers
  • Hats
  • Purses.

Roadkill Fur Never Looked So Good

Can you imagine a raccoon neck muff?

Well, it is a beautiful, luxurious and warm thing to behold.

Although, some people may have mixed feelings about roadkill fur, and others say that it is in poor taste.

They didn’t think that when Daniel Boone wore a “coon skin” cap.

And, what about all of the great mountain people who trap for wild fur as a major part of their income.

Paquin harvest pelts from animals that are “found dead”.

Not only has she started a unique business of roadkill, she is prolonging the benefits of it.

Roadkill is part of an industry that promotes wearing real fur as fashionable and acceptable.

Making use of this natural resource may well create more demand for fur from all sources.

Also, the recognition and acceptance of this artisan’s craft can give fur wearers a shield from criticism.

Besides, she isn’t harming animals, she’s promoting their beauty and taking advantage of a natural resource.

Roadkill Fur Is In Big Demand

Greater spending power in China, Russia, etc. for fur trimmings on clothes and accessories has revised furs’ popularity.

The demand is a GREAT REASON for others to get into the industry.

According to the Fur Information Council of America, the U.S. alone recorded $1.5 billion in fur sales in 2014.

Globally, it is part of an over $35 billion industry.

Paquin believes that making use of animals that would otherwise be thrown away is sensible.

In case you are wondering, her business is “Petite Mort”, which means “little death” in French.

Roadkill Fur II

Start A Roadkill Fur Business

Paquin’s roadkill fur is high-end, ranging from $800 to $2,000, depending on the product and type of fur used.

These posh fur pieces can be found online and on Boston’s fashionable Newbury Street.

Get this, her company rents display space in a handmade goods market.

Not only that, each one of her designs come with a personal note explaining where and when the animal was found.

The designer works with animal control specialists to gather the carcasses, but skins many of them herself.

The value that these products have is that they are handmade, local and last a lifetime.

The roadkill fur business is not just high-end, it is also sustainable.

Find a buyer and start harvesting all of that wild and free roadkill fur for rural money.

Resource:  Why Accidental Fur

Work From Home Is Just What The Doctor Ordered – Recommended By Dr. Rural Money

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Leave a Comment

  1. Reply

    I completely support this. The challenge is always in proving it’s accidental and tagging and tracking is critical. I’m quite happy to work with individuals who have legally binding agreements with highway departments and wildlife officers to broaden my net. The goal is to change to fur industry’s sourcing methods – and with 1 million a day killed on american roads – there is certainly room for everyone. Thank you for the article and support!
    Pamela – Founder of Petite Mort Fur

    • Reply

      Thank you Pamela! When I first read about your company in the Atlanta Journal Constitution, I had to do a post about your wonderful concept. Personally, I have always been and will be a “fur fan.” 🙂 Your designs are a credit to the fur industry.