It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInDigg thisPin on Pinterest

How To Make Money Off The Land

How To Make Money Off The Land While Others Cant / Image by Free Photos Pixabay

Making Money Off The Land Is An Exchange Of Energy

As a rural homesteader, I am often thinking of ways to make money off the land and reinvent myself so I won’t be caught off guard during another recession.

How to make money off the land is a question many large and small farmers are asking themselves in these times of economic uncertainty.

My thinking and planning in terms of how to do it is basic in that I don’t spend a lot of time on anything that doesn’t produce fast results.

Since most of my rural income is generated online by Internet Marketing; I can see whether or not a project is yielding a profit or not, immediately.

That is not to say, making money online is easy, in the beginning.

But, it becomes easier as you become more experienced and tap into the “right” network.

The right network could be one person or a group of learned professionals who take you under their wings and show you their secret strategies to “make money fast” by “torpedo to midship.”

You can use the same strategy to make money off the land, but the results may take longer.

Nevertheless, your success will be the reciprocity of your exchange of energy.

Most of you know that part of my original homesteading plan was to raise small animals such as chickens and goats.

This would have helped me save money thereby keep money in my pockets to buy the other foods I couldn’t grow.

Well, as it turned out, my local government had a different plan when a new business entity took over our one and only small grocery store—specializing in meat.

Strange things happen in politics and business, especially when it affects the local economy and tax base.

Long story short, a new ordinance was passed, which prohibits homeowners from raising livestock!

That is a good example of my living and making money off the land being “torpedoed to midship,” in reverse.

That plan was sunk and I didn’t see it coming.

Nevertheless, I have since made other plans for my one acre country homestead.

Before I go into various Rural Money ideas… I want to mention one of my first article posts that speak to this subject.

It is entitled: How To Make Money On 20 Acres

Here you will see some common and lesser thought of resources hiding in plain sight—waiting to be discovered, extracted and processed into money.

Now that you have explored that list, you may want to do something less daunting, right?

There are many ways to make money off the land, but you can’t be lazy because this is some of the hardest money you will ever earn.

Some of my favorite ways to make money off the land are:

  1. Hemp Fiber Products
  2. Permaculture Garden Vegetables and Fruit—Practice these 7 Steps To Create A Permaculture Garden. My approach is to hide my Permaculture Garden in the woods with wild fruit, vegetables, mushrooms… fresh creek water, and the ever presence of deer thanks to a salt lick and/or corn. Walk your woods and take inventory.
  3. Sweet Potatoes
  4. Boer Meat Goats
  5. Heirloom Chickens, Ducks, Turkeys, Partridges, Peacocks, etc.
  6. Heirloom Black Pigs—Major Selling Point: With the alleged outbreak of Swine Flu in Africa, China now wants a trade deal with the U.S. for pork and soybeans. Raising small livestock for the online specialty meat market is lucrative.
  7. Pine Straw and Needles, Pine Pollen for Natural Medication Do you know that pine pollen can be used as flour for baking cakes? It is commonly used as flour in China. They harvest the pollen flowers, beat off the pollen and fine sift it as flour. There are many pine pollen products on Amazon, but I’ve never seen it marketed as Pine Pollen Flour.
  8. Canning for Hire—Major Selling Point: Many people grow a lot of vegetables and fruit, but don’t have the time or wherewithal to can it. That’s where your Blue Ribbon Canning Skills come in.
  9. HoneybeesI plan to put a hive near my blueberry bushes and plant flowers nearby that attract honey bees. Then, I’ll leave it alone for them to make wild honey. I won’t let the hive fall apart, but I won’t make a fuss over it either. Bees and honey are in demand.
  10. Wild Onions and Garlic These aromatics can be fermented into vinegar, tinctures and an array of natural products, since “natural” is trending heavily.


Why You Need To Make Money Off The Land…

If the economic indicators are right, the U.S. will face another Great Depression worse than 2008.

If more people were skilled in agriculture and growing their own meat, vegetables and fruit during The Great Depression, less people would have needed subsidy from Uncle Sam.

I can say that because my grandparents made it through this dire period by doing just that—living and making money off the land.

When the rolling store came by ever so often, my grandmother bought only what she didn’t have or some “white, sliced bread” as a treat for the grand kids.

I don’t remember her or my mother making whole white bread—but plenty of yeast rolls, biscuits and corn bread.

People were not prepared like so many aren’t today.

They rely on going to the supermarket for every bite of food they eat.

My favorite saying is, “It wasn’t raining when Noah built the Ark.”

And, with the onset of another Great Migration, there will be enough poverty to go around.

The sad truth is people take their poverty with them—I did too over 35 years ago.

Whether you live in the north or south, when our precious “dollar” disappear, many will be living on the brink of starvation because they won’t know how to make money off the land.

Nevertheless, if you study my list on How To Make Money On Twenty Acres, and other means on this blog, you won’t shutter so hard in the face of economic hardship.

People who live and make money off the land tend to fare better than those who don’t.

Japan Is The Best Example Of How To Make Money Off The Land

When I watch how rural Japan live and make money off the land, I can see that rural America is doing the complete opposite.

Rural Japanese are growing older just as many rural Americans are.

But, they’re less likely to stop farming or tending a garden, fruit trees and fields—even when they’re alone.

They just keep going until the end because they know they have to eat and no one else will provide for them.

Usually, children work in the cities and neighbors share.

But, it is their independent hard work and backbone that keeps food on the table, money in their pockets and big smiles on their faces.

They grow crops and raise livestock with the intention of earning money.

And, they don’t have so-called “hobby farms.”

Nevertheless, they produce enough for the country’s produce market or at least to sell at local markets.

The difference is they have to sell something in order to get the other things they need.

They also honor reciprocity with the land, which gives back to them bountifully and beautifully after caring for the land.

I admire their relationship with the land because it was created for us to use to live and make money.

In contrast, why do many rural homesteads in America have acres of land with nothing growing or being produced on it?

If there are old fruit trees, beehives… it’s all left to be taken over by time and weeds.

These precious resources could be providing sustenance for someone who would be happy to gather fallen fruit and collect honey from neglected hives.

When someone has plowed and planted a vegetable garden… for many years…  and it’s neglected, it’s like throwing away the fruit of their hard work—money.

If you’re still wondering how to make money off the land while others can’t, you have only to look around you—it’s in plain sight.


You Might Also Like.

It's only fair to share...Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInDigg thisPin on Pinterest

Leave a Comment