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homestead-toughHomestead Tough Females Were Not Born Tough

Even homestead tough females contemplating this lifestyle may face hardships, yet with mental and physical fortitude, you can solve everyday problems.

The homesteading life can be very tough for any woman.

Whether your homestead is rural, urban, wilderness or you’re temporarily pitching a tent or parking a camper, or permanently settling into a spacious home or building a 12 x 14 cabin, you must possess the deed or title, and improve the land, before you can consider yourself to be a homesteader.

Any person can lay claim to homesteading, but it takes a pioneer and trail blazer that’s homestead tough to commit at least five years to live on the land, and improve it by upgrading from living in a tent to building a home (by hand), growing crops and fruit trees, and raising small animals to eat.

After five years of experiencing financial challenges, harsh physical labor, extreme weather conditions, plagues of fleas and ticks, wildlife and insect threatened crops, limited fuel and water supplies that can turn simple cooking and heating chores into difficult trials, the toll may be overwhelming.

As a result of these circumstances, many beginner homesteaders will not stay on the land long enough to fulfill the dream.

Homesteaders who persevere are rewarded with the satisfaction of becoming self-sufficient on your own ground, and the opportunity to run the homestead as a profitable home based business.

For Every Homestead Tough Problem There Is A Solution

Setting up a homestead cash-strapped is the most difficult hardship to face, and every other problem either evolves from the lack of money or revolves around it.

Listed below are the top six problems that cash-strapped homesteaders could face, and a means of dealing with a difficult situation.

Problem 1: Money

Solution: For the “homestead tough”, this lifestyle provides a ready access to a cottage industry to produce homemade and handmade products, and digital products and services for sale via the local market and Internet.

Problem 2: Homestead Shelter

Solution: Whether building a house on your own land or buying an existing one, you will need a source of income and/or resources such as a USDA-RD home loan. If you’re temporarily homesteading in a tent or camper, you will perfect the skill of cooking on an open fire and boiling water for survival.

Problem 3: Dirt, Disease, Insects

Solution: An ounce of cleaning and disinfecting prevention is worth a pound of cure in terms of preventing diseases from outdoor toileting, using open wells and other water sources, gardening and tending to animals without gloves and rubber boots (trust me). A gallon of Clorox kills bacteria, ants, purifies water, etc.

Problem 4: Fire Wood, Candles, Soap

Solution: You will need a stable source of money, funds, income or something to barter to replace food and household items, and to make your own candles and soap.

Problem 5: Isolation, No Doctors, Pharmacy, Phone

Solution: No social life, no problem. You’re now living like the Amish, because of the distance between homesteads. In the winter, you’re shut in getting things ready for spring, and making home remedies. You have to make the most of any trip to the nearest town. Living in many remote areas mean a dead zone, therefore, having a CB-Radio can save your life in an emergency.

Problem 6: Law And Order, Hunting

Solution: Local government exist everywhere, but out of sight, out of mind. Consider how you will protect yourself and your prepper supplies from thieves, and hunt for fresh meat, if necessary.

There are many hardships of homesteading, and all homestead tough females were not born tough.

You make yourself tough by reading about other homesteaders who are doing it hard.

You keep a journal about your first five years as a homesteader.

As part of your homesteading journey, think about what problems you faced, and how you overcame them.

While you’re dreaming of becoming a homesteader, ask yourself what would life be like for ‘me’ the first five years.

You may discover that you are tougher than you first believed.

As a homestead tough homesteader, you are the survivor.

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